Cyprus // Family Travel Guide

  The ease of weekend travel from Amman is life giving. We can hop to any number of places on a long weekend or day trip to any of the sights within Jordan to hike or explore. Sometimes however, regardless of the ease of travel, we find ourselves having just wound down from school, life and work when the time comes to jump back on the airplane or into the car and head home. For my birthday and to celebrate the start of summer we headed to Cyprus. The flight was only... Read The Rest →

A Weekend in Beirut // Travel Guide

Earlier this year, Paul and I slipped away from the kids to spend the weekend exploring Beirut. We had always wanted to visit together, but when we watched Anthony Bourdain become trapped in his hotel as the war began in 2006, we were left with great sadness. We had just gotten married and I’d just graduated from design school and landed my first job at an architecture firm. Paul was developing and selling commercial real estate. Our lives together had just begun and although we didn’t know exactly where we were headed now... Read The Rest →

To Dye For // Safi Women’s Association for Social Development

Like a chalk line, snapped hard, but not at all precisely, between the parched hills of Jordan and the almost suffocating quiet shores of the Dead sea lies a ribbon of dusty road that leads to the Lowest Point on Earth. The road is quiet and desolate in most spaces, but sprinkled haphazardly with small picnics, pre wadi hike meets and greets, umbrella’d plastic tables, rental sheesha pipes, cold sodas in old reach-in coolers that are plugged into seemingly endless extension cords that draw their electricity from God only knows where.... Read The Rest →

Proof That You Can Always Go Back Home // Chennai 2018

In January I returned to Chennai. For those of you who have been following along for a while, we lived there from 2013-2015 and it became, amidst the ins and outs and ups and downs of living life in India, unequivocally our home. My children attended school there and my husband worked. I spent days, nights and weekends, photographing the city.  We lived, really lived, all the good and the bad parts, two precious years of our lives in that city. I created a collection of photographs that I continue to sort through... Read The Rest →

Creative Community Spaces: Darat Al Funun, Amman

  Amman is a large and sprawling city of about 4 million, that doesn’t include the great number of guests, which include so many of the region’s refugees. Amman is largely monochromatic, its architecturally similar building style (an ordinance, I am told, put in place by the King) spreads out over the bumps of the city like a quilt over a resting body. There are few parks in Amman to which people flock on the weekends for picnics and any highway roadside in Jordan, with a bit of shade, is coveted picnic... Read The Rest →

Petra // Family Travel

Petra is just a short, three hour drive, from our home base in Amman. One beautiful, fall Friday we load up and cruise out of town, music on, coffee in hand, while the kids spot dust devils spawning along the horizon from the back seat and the way back seat. Amman is built atop a series of hills and sends you down a luge of sorts each time you head out of town in any direction. You seem to descend to each destination from the center of the city, as if by airplane.... Read The Rest →

Ajloun Olive Harvest

My arrival checklist in a new country, includes cataloging, collecting and sampling all that there is to know about a place. To dig deeper, without being intrusive, to be patient and to know that I have two entire years, where many travelers have just a few days and to simultaneously realize that I only have two years when some people have a lifetime. And just like earning the trust of a child, the relationship of a long staying guest in a new country comes with a certain delicate dance, a shy smile, a kind gesture, a... Read The Rest →

Cheney Rodeo 2017

  I feel like I’m always in a hurry to finish things, but this project has no start and no finish. It began long before I even began my career in photography and will last, long after I am gone. I’ll never grow tired of, or feel rushed by this project, and in that is a great sense of love and of ease. I envision looking back at these photos ten and twenty and more years from now and finding things that look exactly the same, but also marveling at... Read The Rest →

Pantsuit Nation Book // Published

I am proud to share that a photograph that I took of my brave friend Lauren Cooper of Aspen Street Cakes and her daughter Molly, will be published in the Pantsuit Nation Book, due on shelves this Friday, May 5th, 2017. My photo is nothing without Lauren’s story and her courage sharing it with Pantsuit Nation. In Lauren’s own words: This is my thirteen-year-old daughter, Molly. She has Rett syndrome, a neurological disorder that affects one in ten thousand girls and women worldwide. Molly cannot walk or talk and often has... Read The Rest →

Lauren’s Lemon Ricotta Crepes

On the brink of another move this July (To Amman, Jordan in case you missed it!), my body and mind have begun to ramp up, once again, to weather what is said to be one of life’s most stressful occasions. Moving is a way of life for us. We’ve moved five times in the past seven years, and people always ask if moving gets easier. The answer is, “No, but you get better at it” or you quit. And I’m not a quitter. Although I did quit smoking once, but... Read The Rest →

Society of the Four Arts // Palm Beach

I prefer to marvel over the bounty of a person’s garden than a person’s pocketbook. At the level which we are all one, where we tend to nature, from which we all came and raise bounty from mere seeds. We can all be equal when our fingernails and the cracks in our skin are soiled brown from sowing the same earth. I spent 10 years living in Palm Beach County, I’ll admit to times that I wanted it all: the lifestyle, the money and the beautiful, perfectly sculpted hedge wall.... Read The Rest →

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